can someone complete this paper for me? the outline of the paper and the instructions are provided. i also attached an example of what the paper should look like as well.

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can someone complete this paper for me?

the outline of the paper and the instructions are provided.

i also attached an example of what the paper should look like as well.

can someone complete this paper for me? the outline of the paper and the instructions are provided. i also attached an example of what the paper should look like as well.
DRP Page: 1 Student Goals (with Deadlines) • Review DRP Assignment File and Example DRP • Follow DRP Instructions (see next page) • Email/submit DRP outline to Dr. Gillespie by February 24 • Watch inbox for developmental feedback from Dr. Gillespie by the end of March • Review feedback from Dr. Gillespie and revise/elaborate /finalize accordingly • Email/submit DRP Final to Dr. Gillespie by May 2 Assignment Requirements • Submission : Email assignments as an attachment to [email protected] • DRP Outline is a brief statement of intention for each of the following Headings: o Practical Problem o Proposed Intervention o Proposed Motivational State o Hypothesis o Evidence to Support Hypothesis • DRP Fin al is a full draft of the paper that includes: o Testable Hy pothesis that makes theoretical sense o Scholarly e vidence to support the Hypothesis o In-text citations with Reference page • In-text citations 1 with Reference Page o Only two direct quotations (otherwise paraphrase and use in -text citations ) o Cite at least four peer -reviewed articles from Psychology including at least one review article (Psychological Review, Psychological Bulletin) o Cite the course textbook (either 2015 or 2018) 1 https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/apa_style/apa_formatting_and_style_guide/in_text_citations_the_basics.html EXP4304 Motivation (3 credit hours) Instructor: Jennifer Z. Gillespie, PhD DRP ASSIGNMENT FILE Last Updated : December 31, 2022 DRP Page: 2 DRP Instructions Step #1 : Select one “Practical Problem ” from the textbook 2: • “Child at Home” • “Employee at Work” • “Athlete or Musician” • “Medical Patient” • “Suffering Student” Step #2: Select one “Proposed Interventio n” from the textbook 3 (and read relevant chapters): • “Supporting Psychological Need Satisfaction” (Psychological Needs) • “Increasing a Growth Mindset” (Mindset s) (The Self and its Strivings) • “Promoting Emotion Knowledge” (Individual Emotions) • “Cultivating Compassion” (Nature of Emotions) Step #3 : Select one “Motivational State ” from the textbook 4 (that makes theoretical sense): • Resilient Self -Efficacy Beliefs • Autonomy Need Satisfaction • Flow Experience • Fully Functioning Individual • Mastery Motivational Orientation • Difficult, Specific, Self -Congruent Goals • Mastery Goals • Ego Development • Joy • Gratitude Step #4 : Hypoth esize the relation between the “Proposed Intervention” and “Motivational State” : Hypothesis : “The [Proposed Intervention] (vs. Control Group) will improve the [Motivational State] for study participants over time (i.e., Post -test vs. Pre -test).” Step #5 : Add Evide nce to support the Hypothesis ( Proposed Intervention → Motivational State ): • One piece of scholarly evidence comes from the article by [in -text citation] …. • Another piece of evidence … • A final piece of evidence… 2 6th edition, page 500, Box 17 ; 7th edition, page 427, Box 17 3 6th edition, p. 499 ; 7th edi tion, pages 428 -436 4 6th edition, p. 499 ; 7th edition, pp. 425 -426
can someone complete this paper for me? the outline of the paper and the instructions are provided. i also attached an example of what the paper should look like as well.
DRP EXP 4304 1 Student Name DRP Essay EXP 4304 DRP EXP 4304 2 Practical Problem Motivation and emotion are best understood in applied settings. Looking at case studies can help with practicing how to explain, predict, and apply motivation and emotional learning to a specific case. The goal is to understand and evaluate the current level of the person’s emotion and to figure out the best way to improve on the motivation by understanding the emotions and current motivational mindset of the person. In this case, a musician wants to practice and improve their skill, but sees slow to none improvement in skill level. She struggles with very little visible improvement which is frustratingly contradictive to her goal of being an elite musician (Reeve J., 2015, p. 500) . Propose Interve ntion The best way to tackle the situation of stagnant motivation is through selecting the correct intervention. Reeve (2015) discusses four state of the art interventions; supporting psychological need satisfaction, increasing a growth mindset, promoting emotion knowledge, and cultivating compassion (Reeve J, 2015, pp. 501 -510). For the musician, the chosen intervention is intervention two, increasing a growth mindset. A growth mindset involved an understanding that the brain changes with learning . Releva nt theories include growth mindsets and the self – concordance model. (Reeve J., 2015, p.504). Reeve (2015) identifies three key types of needs; physiological, psychological, and implicit. Implicit needs are the needs that are socialized and developed over time and contribute to our satisfaction and want for achievement and growth. There are different types of growth mindset, and two key examples are the growth -fixed mindset and master mindset. A mastery DRP EXP 4304 3 growth mindset is important in educating to an indivi dual that learning is a process and that the brain is adjustable and malleable as change occurs. This clarification of implicit needs is necessary to understand how personal growth in an area, such as music talent, is key to motivational growth (Reeve J., 2015, pp.86 -87). The self -concordance model is important for answering two key questions about motivation: (1) how do people decide what goals to set? And (2) how does this sometimes improve motivation and sometimes diminish well -being? Self -concordant go als have been shown to “generate and sustain greater effort than self -discordant goals” (Reeve J., 2015, p. 317). A balance of self -interests and core values create a higher strength in goal achievement when it comes to developing past environmental pressu re and internal struggles (Reeve J. , 2015, p. 318). Motivational State A large deterrent to motivation is the growth -fixed mindset. Growth -fixed mindsets often seek out performance goals, and achieve these goals with the intentional response being social acceptance. If they perform well, th ey do not look incompetent. This can lead to the goal – achievement satisfaction being entirely rooted outside of the goal -striving person, which can lead to lower and less likely levels of satisfaction over time. Growth m indsets set mastery goals. This is a more personal growth mindset, in which task engagement serves the focus of individual improvement at a skill. The setting of mastery goals lowers the level of outside criticism and creates higher individual autonomy whe n it comes to skill progression (Reeve J., 2015, p. 254). Mastery motivational orientation is important to changing how a person achieves their goals. Mastery goals allow people to learn something new or develop a skill, but without the DRP EXP 4304 4 guarantee that the y will not look incompetent in the process. Dweck and Leggett document a psychological review comparing mastery -oriented patterns to what they call helpless patterns, which is comparable to the growth -fixed mindset. The article documents how mastery goal achievement involves seeking out challenges and learning new effective strategies for dea ling with these strategies. They document that mastery -oriented children in their test study did not make as many excuses for failure as the growth -fixed mindsets, and portrayed higher levels of optimism in further facings of challenges. Dweck and Leggett also found that there was no difference in the ability to learn or achieve the goal, simply a difference in the attitudes and application of the learned knowledge. Whil e analyzing why the children had different growth mindsets, it comes back to what kind of goals the individual is attempting to achieve. Performance goals showed individuals attempting to prove their abilities while mastery goals displayed the learning att empt at improving ability. Mastery mindsets showed less response to social rejection, which helps define that the individual’s ability to reach a goal is rooted in self – esteem and personal perception of self -worth. Dweck and Leggett also found that much of inherent motivation is rooted in personality, but that personality is a part of the brain and can adjust to learning and new experiences. Because of this, mastery goals can be taught (pp . 256 – 269). Testable Hypothesis To help our musician understand growth and achievement, we will be testing the effect of teaching and adapting mastery goals to talent achievement. The testable hypothesis is that adopting a growth fixed mindset as compared to a self -fixed achievement model will improve mastery goal achi evement over time. Using a pre -po st-test experimental design, we will survey a DRP EXP 4304 5 group of amateur musicians from a high school with a survey that evaluates how they view their personal talent in music. This survey will also document self -esteem and some ques tion on personal perception of level of talent as well as how easily they see themselves improving over time. A control group of the same size will also be surveyed and will receive guidance without the mastery goal intervention over the three week period. A three week intervent ion period will be implemented for the experiment group in which mastery goal themes are taught to the students. These themes will involve how mastery goals create better autonomy, how personality can be learned, and how even small i ncremental growth can be perceived as relevant to reaching the end goal. The two groups will be surveyed again at the end of the period to compare changes in levels of self -esteem, talent perception, and overall goal achievement. Evidence to Support Hypot hesis The support for the hypothesis will cover two sections of mastery goals, a section covering how master goals affect self -evaluation and a section on how mastery goals are proved affective . Self -evaluation as well as goal conflict are two important aspects that affect well -being when it comes to motivation. Martin B., McNally J., & Taggar S. analyze the importance that self -evaluation has on goal performance. The results of their study reveal that self -evaluation is a very important part of goal set ting and the outlook of pursuing knowledge for the self created higher values of satisfaction. They also found that the tendency to set performance -goals is not affected by the knowledge of being evaluated, but simply by the knowledge that external evaluat ion may exist. The results were highest in success rates based on satisfaction in goal achievement when achievement goals are set regardless of the validation of an authority figure DRP EXP 4304 6 (pp. 91 -100). Kelly R., Mansell W., and Wood A. take a different look at g oal setting to analyze the effect on well -being. This study analyzes four motivational concepts that affect goal setting; goal conflict, goal ambivalence, self -discrepancy, and self -concordance. The most relevant support for my hypothesis comes from the an alysis of self -discrepancy and concordance. Discrepancy deals with the challenges of the self -perception, and the conflicts between the actual self and the ideal self. This is relevant to the assumption that the ideal self is better at a talent than the cu rrent achieved level. This results in higher rates of depression and anxiety as well as being associated with lower life satisfaction. Self -concordance is the mindset in which an individual’s goals satisfy intrinsic needs and creates autonomy. This resulte d in higher understanding of goal importance as well as better general health (pp.212 -229). In the study by Gray D., Change Y., and Anderman E., mastery goals are implemented with a group of students to impact their motivational goals. By implementing mastery goal teaching over that of performance oriented goal setting, the study showed higher levels of academic success as well as higher self -concepts of academic achievement ( pp. 9 -21). Achievement of the goal is also strongly related to autonomy and th e environment in which the goal is being achieved. Higher levels of mastery goal setting communicated higher connection and interest to the goal as compared to performance driven goals. A decline in goal achievement can be seen when perceive d social constr uct is stronger, and social influence was only progressive to goal achievement when the social perception was autonomous. Autonomy produces higher need to achieve a goal, and acted as a more influential motive than controlled motives (Benita M., Roth G., & Deci E., 2014, pp. 258 -267). DRP EXP 4304 7 Mastery goals deal greatly with mindsets and self -perception. Self -perception in which the individual uses the set goal as a definitive factor of their individual personality showed higher rates of satisfaction and interest. Furthermore, mastery goals are also associated with higher levels of well -being and prove effective in heightening self -awareness. This contributes to understanding of the steps to goal achievement and more satisfaction in each step toward achieving goal since each moment is construed and constructive and as attributing more knowledge. DRP EXP 4304 8 References Benita M., Deci E., & Roth G. (2014). When are mastery goals more adaptive? It depends on experiences of autonomy support and autonomy. [Electronic version]. Journal of Educational Psychology, 106 (1), 258 -267. Crouzevialla M., Smeding A., Butera F. (2015, Sep 25). Striving for excellence sometimes hinders high achievers: Performance -approach goals deplete arithmetical performance in students with high working memory capacity. PlOS ONE 10(9), 1-22. Dweck, C. S., & Leggett, E. L. (1988). A social -cognitive approach to motivation and personality [Electronic version]. Psychological Review , 95 (2), 256 -273. Gray, D. L., Chang, Y., & Anderman, E. M. (2015, May). Conditional effects of mastery goal structure on changes in students’ motivational beliefs: Need for cognition matters [Electronic version]. Elsevier Learning and Individual Differences , 40 , 9 -21. Kelly, R. E., Mansell, W., & Wood, A. M. (2015, May 6). Goal conflict and well -being: A review and hierarchical model of goal conflict, ambivalence, self -discrepancy and self – concordance [Electronic version]. Elsevier Personality and Individual Differences , 85 , 212 -229. Martin B., McNally J. & Taggar S. (20 16). Determining the importance of self -evaluation on the goal -performance effect in goal setting: Primary findings. [Electronic version]. Canadian Journal of Behavioral Science, 48(2), 91 -100. DRP EXP 4304 9 Reeve J. (2015) Understanding motivation and emotion (6 th ed.) . Hoboken NJ : John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
can someone complete this paper for me? the outline of the paper and the instructions are provided. i also attached an example of what the paper should look like as well.
3 Designing A Research Proposal Name University EXP 4304 Dr. Date DRP Outline Practical problem: Medical Patient Proposed intervention: Promoting emotional knowledge Motivational state: Resilient self-efficiency beliefs. Hypothesis: Promoting emotional knowledge can improve resilient self-efficiency beliefs for medical students over time. Evidence to support the thesis statement The first piece of scholarly that can be used in supporting the hypothesis is the book by Dimala (2023) on health professional stress, self-efficiency and social family support; who carried out research on healthcare stress and found out that emotional knowledge allowed healthcare professionals to identify causes of stress thus improve resilience on their self-efficiency believes. Another piece of evidence that supports the hypothesis can be justified from the article by Shuman 2020 about how emotional intelligence can improve resilience as it focuses on how stressful situations impact a person psychologically and how emotional knowledge allows people to improve resilience in handling the situation allowing them to recover from the incident. The final evidence that supports the hypothesis is the study of emotional intelligence and self-efficiency of medical professionals by Pandey, which addresses issues medical professionals face in their highly stressful environment and how emotional intelligence allows them to cope with the situation, thus improving their self-efficiency beliefs thus achieving the goals of the healthcare facility. Reference Dimala, C. P., Zubaedi, A., Sovitriana, R., Hakim, A. R., & Mora, L. (2023). Health Professional Stress, Self-Efficiency, and Social Family Support Towards Burnout with Resilience as Moderator and Mediator in Health Workers Handling Covid-19 In Karawang. resmilitaris, 13(2), 340-355. Shuman, C. (2020). Emotional intelligence can improve resilience. Psychology Today. Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/trial-triumph/202008/emotional-intelligence-can-improve-resilience Pandey, S. K. (2014). A study of emotional intelligence and self-efficacy of medical professionals.

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